Выступление Витренко на международной конференции в Германии печатают в разных странах мира

Выступление Витренко на международной конференции в Германии печатают в разных странах мира

 

В австралийском журнале E.I.R.Strategic Alert Weekly Newsletter (Volume 31, №.49, December 6, 2017) опубликована статья о выступлении лидера Прогрессивной социалистической партии Украины, доктора экономических наук, народного депутата Украины 2 и 3 созывов Наталии Витренко «История успеха» Европейского Союза в Украине. Сокращение численности и обнищание населения».

Мировому сообществу чрезвычайно важная правдивая информация об Украине.

Важен анализ причин разрушения экономики, обнищания и уничтожения ее населения. Вот почему выступление Наталии Витренко на конференции в Германии 26 ноября с. г. вызвало огромный интерес в разных уголках мира.

Что подтверждает и публикация в Австралии.

См. статью «История успеха» Европейского Союза в Украине. Сокращение численности и обнищании населения» на английском языке

Пресс-служба ПСПУ

The “Success Story” of the EU in Ukraine:

Depopulation and Poverty

A special guest of the Nov. 25-26 Schiller Institute international conference was economist Natalia Vitrenko, a former People’s Deputy of Ukraine, current leader of the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine, and longstanding ally of the Schiller Institute. In her speech, Dr. Vitrenko reviewed what has happened in her country since the 2014 coup on the Maidan, led by fascist extremists and supported by the United States and most European countries, which continue to this day to back the illegal putsch.

We cite a few of the specific figures she gave: Real GDP, according to World Bank figures for 2014-2016, fell by one-half, to 50.9% of its 2013 level. Previously, the GDP had already been slashed under the liberal economic model dictated since 1992 by the IMF.

The integration process into the EU, begun in 2014, resulted in the loss of the huge Russian markets. «Entire sectors of our national economy have been lost as a result: rocketbuilding, ship-building, the aircraft industry, and the automotive industry. Machine-building was the powerful core of industry in Soviet Ukraine, comprising 30.5% of total industrial output in 1990. As of 2013, this share had fallen to 10%, and by 2016, to only 5.8% of a total industrial output which itself has fallen by 25% since 2014.” If the current policy continues, machine-building is expected to account for no more than 2% of industrial output in 2020.

Unemployment has increased accordingly, she showed, forcing at least 6 million Ukrainians to go abroad to find work, even before the fighting began in the Donbass.

The national currency (hryvnia) has been devalued by a factor of well over three, while prices, as shown by government statistics, nearly tripled (up by a factor of 2.72) over the past 3 years. The minimum wage in 2015-2016 stood at only half the value it had in 2013, and has since been raised slightly.

The monthly minimum pension imposed by the Poroshenko regime is less than half the 2013 level, and approximately one half of the pensioners in Ukraine receive that minimum level. Under the new pension reform adopted last month, as demanded by the IMF, the pension age has in effect been raised, and the actual amount of each pension reduced.

As a result, the population of Ukraine is dying off at horrific rates. “Ukraine ranks first in Europe in 2017 in the level of mental illnesses and the death rate of the population”, Vitrenko stated. Of the 52 million population of Ukraine in 1990, economists estimate today, based on levels of bread consumption (in the absence of any census since 1990), that no more than 25 million people live in Ukraine today. Those living in Crimea and the Donbass republics comprise 6 million of the overall loss, which means that “Ukraine has lost 21 million people since 1990 through emigration and the excess of deaths over births”

The 2017 United Nations Human Development report notes that Ukraine fell from 50th place on the Human Development Index in 2015, to 84th place in 2016.

The situation is indeed dire, which is why Nathalia Vitrenko,